APOA2 and Saturated Fats: Optimizing Your Ketogenic Diet

Our genes are a template for how our bodies work. Most people on keto diets tend to consume high amount of saturated fats. The diet works only when the stored fat is proprely broken down and used for energy. Certain variants of the APOA2 gene tend to interfere with this saturated fats metabolism and hence, such carriers may not get the desired benefit from this diet.

There seems to be an endless debate about whether saturated fats are good or bad for your health.

The truth is, all of us need a little bit of fat for some body functions like hormone production or maintenance of the cell integrity.

But, what is considered ‘too much’ for your body is determined by certain gene variants you carry.

Let’s explore this concept with a diet that’s been constantly gaining popularity for weight loss and prevention and treatment of certain health conditions:

The ketogenic diet

The basis of this diet ketosis, which refers to the metabolic process in which body converts stored fats into energy releasing ketones in the process.

Hence, the conventional keto diet, which calls for high consumption of fats may work only if the stored fat is metabolized efficiently.

Several genes contribute to how your body reacts to saturated fats.

APOA2 gene is one of the them that determines how well you tolerate saturated fats and how well you can transport cholesterol.

Depending on the variant of this gene you carry, you may need to modify the keto diet a little bit, in order to maximize its benefits to your body.

From the evolutionary perspective, certain human societies, such as those in the colder northern regions are likely to have subsisted on large intake of fats for hundreds of generations.

As a result, they could have developed adaptations that enable them to metabolize this macro ingredient in food quite efficiently.

If you have inherited those genes, then your body is better able to cope with fats intake.

APOA2 gene and Saturated fats

APOA2 gene produces a protein apolipoprotein -II, that plays a role in fat metabolism and obesity .

Individuals with the sensitive variant of this gene are more prone to increased BMI (6.8 times greater BMI), waist circumference, and body weight in response to high levels of saturated fat (more than 22g of saturated fats per day).

This was an observation in comparison to the people with the non-sensitive variant of the gene consuming the same amount of saturated fats.

It is vital for the carriers of the ‘sensitive variant’ to limit their saturated fat intake.

However, there was no difference among individuals with both versions, in terms of weight and BMI when saturated fat intake was low (less than 22g per day).

One possible mechanism that could help explain the above gene-diet interactions  is the sensitive variant of this gene produces lower levels of the protein, APOA2 (regulates the satiety response),  resulting in low satiety and  greater appetite among individuals with higher saturated fat intake.

This appetite may preferably be for foods rich in saturated fat and this higher fat intake would lead to greater weight.

 

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Other genes like FTO, PPARG also impact the metabolism of saturated fats.

What does this mean for you? How does this impact your ketogenic diet success?

Carrying even 2-3 variants that affect the saturated fats metabolism can pose a challenge to cholesterol control and weight loss.

It is thus vital for such individuals to alter their diet with lesser intake of saturated fatty acids.

Replacing saturated fatty acids with mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and poly-unsaturated fatty acids can be a good start.

Sources of MUFA

  • Nuts
  • Olive oil
  • Avocados
  • Sesame oil
  • Peanut butter

Sources of PUFA

  • Flax seeds
  • Fish like salmon, mackerel
  • Walnuts
  • Sunflower oil
  • Corn oil

Simple ways to reduce saturated fats in your diet

  • Read the nutrition labels. Many low fat food products may be high in refined carbohydrates, that may increase your triglyceride levels.
  • Terms such as “ low” or “lite” could be misleading. The best is to compare the fat content of similar food products.
  • Adopt healthy cooking methods like baking, broiling and grilling for cooking vegetables and meats. Try to avoid frying foods. Use liquid oils such as canola, sesame, mustard seed oils instead of fats of animal origin such as butter, ghee or vanaspati.
  • Instead of butter or ghee, try cooking with herbs, spices, lemon juice, etc.

Do you have your DNA raw data file from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, FTDNA, LivingDNA, etc.?

Upload your DNA raw data to Xcode Life to know your genetic predisposition to hypertension.

Xcode’s nutrigenetics assessment includes the APOA2 gene. You can also learn about this gene and several more with this assessment.  Visit www.xcode.life or write to us at hello@xcode.ife

Updated 30 June, 2020